February Seasonal Produce Guide

Welcome to my February Seasonal Produce Guide. Seasonal produce is cheaper, fresher, more nutritional, and eco-friendly because it doesn’t have to travel as far.

February Seasonal Produce Guide

The holidays are over and we are well into the dark dreary days of winter. Sadly there are just thirteen items in season this month. What is in season in February? Produce peaks at different times throughout the US so there will be some variances. But here is a general guide.

Every month I will be sharing a produce guide with seasonal recipe suggestions. Check out my February Seasonal Produce Guide below for more information on how to choose, store and prepare each ingredient

February Seasonal Produce Guide

Broccoli
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Broccoli

Broccoli is part of the cabbage family and is a good source of vitamin C and vitamin K.

Buying

Choose broccoli that has closed florets and deep green color. Avoid broccoli with yellowing or that is soft.

Storing

Refrigerated broccoli will keep for up to five days.

Preparing

Wash and then cut into appropriately sized pieces. All but the very end of the stock can be used.

Recipes

Cheesy Broccoli BitesKathryn’s Kitchen Blog
Instant Pot Broccoli and Rice CasseroleSweet Pea’s Kitchen

Brussels Sprouts
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Brussel Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are delicious and can be boiled, steamed, sauteed, grilled, roasted, and even fried. They are even great when served raw and shredded into a slaw. They are part of the cabbage family and are most commonly green but there are a few varieties that are purple in color. They are high in vitamin C and vitamin K.

Buying

If possible choose brussels sprouts that are still on the stalk. Look for brussels sprouts with bright, firm, and compact heads.

Storing

Brussels sprouts can be refrigerated in a plastic bag for up to a week.

Preparing

Remove brussels sprouts from the stalk and cut off the stem. You can also remove any of the loose outer leaves.

Recipes

Bacon Pecan Sauteed Brussel SproutsSweet Pea’s Kitchen
Air Fryer Sweet and Spicy Brussels SproutsEveryday Family Cooking

Cabbage
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Cabbage

Cabbage can be dark green, purple, white, or light green. Cabbage is a great source of vitamin K, vitamin C, and fiber.

Buying

Look for cabbage that is compact with blemish-free leaves. Avoid cabbages that are light for their size.

Storing

Cabbage can be refrigerated for up to seven days. Once cut cabbage should be stored in an airtight container.

Preparing

Remove the outer leaves and then slice into pieces. Wash under running water and remove the core.

Recipes

Cabbage Salad with Apples and WalnutsThe Clever Meal
Cream of Turkey Soup with Cabbage and KaleLow Carb Yum

Cauliflower
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Cauliflower

Cauliflower is super popular right now. Masquerading as a pizza crust, mashed potatoes, and rice. Cauliflower comes in several varieties including white, orange, green, and purple. Cauliflower can be roasted, grilled, boiled, fried, steamed, pickled, or eaten raw. It is high in vitamin C and vitamin K.

Buying

Look for cauliflower that is compact with firmly attached bright green leaves. Avoid cauliflower with brown spots or spread out sections.

Storing

Cauliflower can be refrigerated for up to five days.

Preparing

Wash cauliflower just before use. Remove the outer leaves, stem, and core. Then break or cut it into smaller pieces. Reusable Block

Recipes

Grilled Ginger Cauliflower Steaks With Tahini SauceStrength & Sunshine
Vegan Instant Pot Cauliflower SoupPiping Pot Curry

Grapefruit
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Grapefruit

Grapefruit is a citrus fruit known for its sour to semi-sweet flavor. Grapefruit can have red, white or pink flesh. Grapefruit is high in vitamin C and fiber.

Buying

Grapefruits should have skin that is thin, smooth, firm, and blemish-free. Grapefruits should also be heavy for their size.

Storing

Grapefruits can be stored at room temperature for up to a week or in the refrigerator for two to three weeks.

Preparing

Grapefruits can be peeled and sectioned by hand. Using a knife you can also prepare skinless grapefruit segments. With a sharp knife, cut off the top and the bottom of the grapefruit and cut away the remaining peel and white pith. Next, either slice the fruit or cut along either side of each segment to release it. If you need the zest, grate it before peeling the fruit.

Recipes

Grapefruit Mimosa with RosemaryEveryday Delicious
Blueberry Grapefruit SmoothieMoms Who Save

Kale
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Kale

Kale can have purple or green leaves and is a member of the cabbage family. Kale is an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin B6.

Buying

Kale should be dark green in color with small to medium-sized leaves.

Storing

Store kale in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to five days.

Preparing

Wash kale and remove the stalk and central vein by hand or with a knife. Chop or tear leaves into bite-sized pieces.

Recipes

Kale and Mushroom Pasta with GingerVegan on Board
Crispy Baked Kale ChipsThe Soccer Mom Blog

Leeks on wooden cutting board
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Leeks

Leeks have a mild onion-like flavor. Leeks are a good source of fiber, vitamin B6, iron and magnesium. They are also a very good source of folate as well as vitamins A, C, and K.

Buying

Look for leeks that are firm and have as much white and light green parts as possible.

Storing

Leeks can be refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Preparing

The dark green leaves are usually tough. Most dishes use just the white and light green portions. Leeks grow in sandy soil and need to be washed thoroughly. Cut off the root and then slice the leek in half vertically. Chop and place in a bowl of cold water. Agitate the leeks well, then drain and use.

Recipes

Mushroom, Leek, and Goat Cheese TartBarth Bakery
Leek Cream SoupSimply Stacie

Lemons on wooden table
Fresh lemons

Lemons

Lemons have a distinctive sour flavor and a variety of culinary uses. The lemon’s juice, rind, and peel are used in a wide variety of foods and drinks. Lemon juice also helps to prevent certain foods, such as apples, bananas, and avocados, from turning brown after being sliced.

Buying

Look for lemons that are heavy for their size, firm, and have smooth thin skin. Medium to large-sized lemons are usually juicier than smaller lemons. Avoid lemons that are soft, spongy, wrinkled and have bumpy skin.

Storing

Lemons can be stored at room temperature for up to 1 week, or in the refrigerator 2-3 weeks.

Preparing

Wash lemons before cutting. The zest (the yellow outer skin) is edible and packs tons of flavor. Remove it with a grater or peeler, taking care not to cut the bitter inner white skin, called the pith.

Recipes

Lemon Chicken, Zucchini, and Tomato Sheet Pan Meal – Raspberries and Kohlrabi
Tangy Lemon Miso Chicken Noodle BowlIn the Kids Kitchen

Sliced Oranges
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Oranges

Oranges can be eaten fresh or processed for their juice or peel. Oranges are a great source of vitamin C.

Buying

Oranges should be firm and heavy for their size. They should also have smooth bright-colored skin. Avoid oranges with blemished and wrinkled skin.

Storing

Oranges can be stored at room temperature for up to five days or refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Preparing

Oranges can be peeled and sectioned by hand. Using a knife you can also prepare skinless orange segments. With a sharp knife, cut off the top and the bottom of the orange and cut away the remaining peel and white pith. Next, either slice the fruit or cut along either side of each segment to release it. If you need the zest, grate it before peeling the fruit.

Recipes

Fruit Tart Recipe with OrangesHousewives of Frederick County
Blood Orange CupcakesTikkido

Parsnips
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Parsnips

Parsnips are a root vegetable closely related to the carrot. Parsnips are high in potassium and fiber.

Buying

Choose parsnips that are firm and smooth. Smaller parsnips may be more flavorful and tender.

Storing

Parsnips can be refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Preparing

Wash parsnips in cold water and cut off both ends. Trim any major rootlets or knobs before cooking. Parsnips can be cooked into savory stews, boiled, mashed, or roasted.

Recipes

Loaded Roasted Parsnip FriesCook at Home Mom
White Bean and Parsnip SoupHunger Thirst Play

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

The rutabaga is a root vegetable that is a cross between the cabbage and the turnip. It has a slightly spicier flavor than the turnip. Rutabagas can reach three to five pounds in weight. Rutabagas contain a small amount of vitamins A and C.

Buying

Rutabagas should be smooth, firm, without blemishes, and heavy for their size. Avoid large roots, they tend to be more fibrous. If you smell a rutabaga, the more pronounced the odor, the more pungent the flavor.

Storing

Rutabagas can be stored unwashed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. The leaves should be removed to prevent the root from drying out.

Preparing

Scrub rutabagas under cold running water before using. Cut into pieces and remove the core if it is brownish. Rutabagas can be boiled, steamed, mashed, roasted, baked, and fried. 

Recipes

Roasted Swede Soup (Rutabaga Soup)Little Sunny Kitchen
Roasted Rutabaga FriesSavor and Savvy

Tangelos
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Tangelos

Tangelos can be eaten fresh or processed for their juice or peel. Tangelos are a great source of vitamin C.

Buying

Tangelos should be firm and heavy for their size. They should also have smooth bright-colored skin. Avoid tangelos with blemished and wrinkled skin.

Storing

Tangelos can be stored at room temperature for up to five days or refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Preparing

Tangelos can be peeled and sectioned by hand. Using a knife you can also prepare skinless tangelo segments. With a sharp knife, cut off the top and the bottom of the tangelo and cut away the remaining peel and white pith. Next, either slice the fruit or cut along either side of each segment to release it. If you need the zest, grate it before peeling the fruit.

Recipes

Tangelo Mint Iced Tea RecipeCutefetti
Winter Citrus Bars with Tangelo & Blood OrangeBird’s Nest Bites

Turnips
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Turnips

Both the turnip root and turnip greens are edible.

Buying

Look for turnips that are heavy for their size and still have their leaves attached. Small to medium-sized turnips tend to be sweeter.

Storing

The longer a turnip is stored the more bitter it becomes. Turnips can be refrigerated for up to three days.

Preparing

Before cooking turnips, wash and peel the skin with a vegetable peeler. Next, trim off the roots and greens.

Recipes

Roasted Turnip StacksDivalicious Recipes
Turnip Carrot Cakes with Garlic AioliFork in the Road

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This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. The dietitian in me loves this kind of information! Great job!

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