June Seasonal Produce Guide

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Welcome to my June Seasonal Produce Guide. Seasonal produce is cheaper, fresher, more nutritious, and eco-friendly because it doesn’t have to travel as far.

May Produce Guide

Summer is just around the corner! There is so much produce in season this month. What is in season in June? Produce peaks at different times throughout the US so there will be some variances. But here is a general guide.

Every month I will be sharing a produce guide with seasonal recipe suggestions. Check out my June Seasonal Produce Guide below for more information on how to choose, store and prepare each ingredient

June Seasonal Produce Guide

Apricot, half and piece isolated on white background

Apricots

Apricot flesh is usually firm and not very juicy. Its taste can range from sweet to tart.

Buying

Look for apricots that are golden in color and firm. Avoid apricots that are a pale greenish-yellow color, rock hard, very soft, or shriveled.

Storing

If your apricots are not quite ripe, place them in a paper bag at room temperature for 2 to 3 days to speed up the ripening process. Unripe apricots can be stored at room temperature up to 5 days. Refrigerate ripe apricots in an airtight container for up to one week.

Preparing

Slice a ripe apricot around the natural seam, twist the two halves in opposite directions, and remove the pit.

Recipes

  • Apricot Upside-down CakesBarth Bakery With a double dose of apricot, these delicious cakes are a flavorful twist on the traditional pineapple version. With a maple brown sugar topping, there’s no need for frosting.
  • Pan-Seared Salmon with Tomato Apricot RelishBabaganosh This Apricot Tomato Relish makes a great light topping for seafood or chicken. It tastes so fresh, just like summer!
  • Apricot and Cream Cheese PastryIt’s Not Complicated There’s no need to make a trip to the bakery and pay a small fortune for some sweet pastries. Now you can make your own and treat yourself whenever you want. Customize these pastries according to the seasons and your taste by adding the fruit of your choice. And if you’re entertaining, a platter of these easily made pastries will be a welcome addition.
blueberries on wooden table

Blueberries

Blueberries are one of only three berries that are native to North America: blueberries, cranberries, and Concord grapes.

Buying

Look for blueberries that are firm, plump, and dark indigo. Avoid berries that are shriveled or show signs of mold.

Storing

Store blue berries in a covered container for up to ten days. Wash just before using.

Preparing

Rinse and drain blueberries well. Check for any remaining stems.

Recipes

Cantaloupe

Cantaloupe

Cantaloupes are sweet and juicy and are high in vitamin A and vitamin C. Their high water content also helps to ward off dehydration.

Buying

Cantaloupe should have a sweet smell, yellow-tinged skin, a thick texture rind, and no stem. Avoid cantaloupe that has an overly sweet smell and soft spots.

Storing

Whole cantaloupes can be stored on the counter for up to four days. Cut cantaloupe should be refrigerated and can be stored for up to two days.

Preparing

The surface of a cantaloupe can contain Salmonella. Before consumption, you should wash and scrub the cantaloupe thoroughly. Cut off the stem end about 3/4 inch from the end. Place the melon cut end down on a cutting surface. Cut the melon in half and gently scrape out the seeds with a spoon. Cut as desired.

Recipes

Cherries

Cherries

Sour or “pie” cherries are tart in flavor and bright red in color. Sour cherries are best when baked. There are many varieties of sweet cherries, Bing probably being the most well known. They are super sweet and juicy and best when eaten fresh.

Buying

Cherries should be clean, bright, shiny, and plump and without any blemishes. Look for cherries with fresh, intact stems, which increases their shelf life. Sweet cherries should be firm but not hard. Sour cherries should be medium-firm. As a general rule the darker the cherry the sweeter the cherry. Avoid cherries with cuts, bruises, or dry stems.

Storing

Refrigerate cherries for up to 10 days.

Preparing

Wash and remove stems just before eating.

Recipes

ear of corn on the cob

Corn

There are six major types of corn: dent corn, flint corn, pod corn, popcorn, flour corn, and sweet corn. Sweet corn is the variety that is sold in stores for cooking.

Buying

Look for corn ears with green husks, fresh silk and tight rows of kernels. Avoid husks with brown spots and dry, yellowed stems. Do not buy corn ears that have kernels with gaps between them and have brittle silks.

Storing

Refrigerate corn in its husk on for 1-2 days. If  corn is unhusked, put the ears in a plastic bag and refrigerate.

Preparing

Keep the ears in their husks until just before cooking.

Recipes

Sliced Kiwi

Kiwi

Kiwis, also known as Chinese gooseberries, are native to China. They were first grown commercially in New Zealand, where they picked up the name “Kiwifruit.” Kiwis have more vitamin C than oranges. There are three varieties of kiwis:

  • Fuzzy kiwis: The most common variety is about the size of a large egg with a fuzzy brown exterior and bright green fruit.
  • Kiwi berries: These are the size of a grape, with a fuzzless, smooth skin and the same bright green interior.
  • Golden kiwi: These have golden flesh that’s sweet and a bit tropical tasting.

Buying

Look for kiwis that are firm but yield to gentle pressure and are blemish-free. Avoid kiwis that are hard, moldy, spotted, or shriveled.

Storing

Ripen kiwis at room temperature. Speed up the ripening process by placing kiwis in a paper bag with an apple or banana. The additional ethylene gas produced by the apple or banana will speed up the ripening process. To slow down ripening, store kiwi in the fridge.

Preparing

Rinse well before eating. Peel and chop kiwis or slice them in half and scoop out the flesh with a spoon. If desired the skin is edible, too.

Recipes

  • Dark Chocolate Covered Kiwi PopsThe Simple Cooking These dark chocolate covered kiwifruit pops are healthy and delicious treats that are perfect to enjoy on a hot summer day! Not only are these super delicious but so healthy they offer number of health benefits because of the two main ingredients it takes to make these.
  • Watermelon PopsiclesLittle Sunny Kitchen These layered watermelon popsicles made with the healthiest ingredients possible are so adorable! These watermelon popsicles are 100% natural, refined sugar-free, gluten-free, low carb, vegan, and delicious. A wonderful summer treat that kids and adults love so much!
  • Simple Kiwi MargaritaSalt & Lavender This kiwi margarita recipe is refreshing, tart, slightly sweet, and perfect for cooling off all summer! It comes together quickly in your blender.
Lettuce

Lettuce

Lettuce is most often used raw in salads and sandwiches but it can also be grilled. Lettuce is an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A, folate, and iron.

Buying

Look for fresh crisp leaves that are tightly bunched. Avoid lettuce with wilted or brown leaves.

Storing

Lettuce should be loosely covered and can be refrigerated for up to one week.

Preparing

Rinse lettuce under cold water. Use a salad spinner or pat the leaves dry to remove excess moisture. Slice, chop or tear as needed.

Recipes

  • Waldorf Salad with ChickenNutmeg & Vinegar Waldorf salad with chicken is a classic American salad with apple, celery, mayonnaise, lemon and walnuts. I added some chicken to make it perfect for lunch.
  • Easy Vegan Chopped SaladWow, It’s Veggie?! This vegan chopped salad is tasty and light yet filling! Choose the type of lettuce that you want based on what is popular and in season where you live! Romains or green leaf works nicely!
  • Big Mac SaladWholesome Yum This easy low carb Big Mac salad recipe is ready in just 20 minutes! A gluten-free, keto cheeseburger salad like this makes a healthy lunch or dinner.
Mangoes

Mangoes

Mangoes are sweet, juicy, and are an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamins C, and beta-carotene. They are also one of the most commonly eaten fruits in the world, with a majority of them coming from India. Mangos are stone fruits, meaning they have one hard seed surrounded by fruit.

Buying

Mangos should yield to gentle pressure and be without blemishes or dark spots. They should also have a sweet fragrant aroma. Color has little to do with ripeness and can vary depending on the type of mango.

Storing

Mangoes can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. Place mangos in a paper bag to speed ripening. Freeze chopped and peeled fruit in a plastic bag with the air squeezed out for up to 3 months.

Preparing

Mangos contain a large, flat pit. To cut a mango, insert the knife into the mango’s flesh until you reach the pit. Slice horizontally against the pit, then continue along the other three sides. To remove the flesh from the skin, score the flesh by cutting just until you reach the skin. Turn the skin inside out and use a paring knife to remove the flesh from the skin.

Recipes

  • Fresh Mango SalsaFresh Coast Eats Fresh Mango Salsa: Fresh Mango, Avocado, Red Pepper, Red Onion, Cilantro and Lime make a refreshing and versatile fruit salsa that is excellent to pair with many main courses.
  • Pickled Mango (Amba)Hilda’s Kitchen Blog Pickled Mango, known as Amba in the Middle East, is sweet, tangy, and absolutely delicious! Serve pickled mangos on the side, like you would pickles, or in sandwiches, especially with falafel!
  • Fresh Mango LassiPiping Pot Curry Fresh Mango Lassi made with just a few ingredients, is so creamy and refreshing. This Mango Lassi which is a favorite to enjoy at Indian restaurants can be easily made at home in no time!
3 peaches

Peaches

The peach is closely related to the almond. The inside of a peach stone tastes remarkably similar to an almond. Peach stones are often used to make a cheap version of marzipan, known as persipan.

Peaches are divided into two types clingstones and freestones, depending on whether the flesh sticks to the stone or not. Both types can have either white or yellow flesh. Peaches with white flesh are typically very sweet with little acidity, while yellow-fleshed peaches typically have an acidic tang coupled with sweetness.

Buying

Look for peaches that are firm but yield to gentle pressure. Avoid peaches with blemishes, bruises, and any hint of green (green is an indicator that the peach was picked too early and will not ripen.)

Storing

Store ripe peaches at room temperature for up to 2 days. Keep peaches separated and do not allow them to touch. Peaches stored too closely together will ripen more quickly and encourage spoiling. Ripen peaches in a brown paper bag and watch them closely as they can ripen within 24 hours.

For long term storage, here is more information on how to freeze peaches.

Preparing

Wash peaches just before use. If cooking peaches, remove the skin as it can become tough when cooked. To remove the skin, cut an X through the skin of each peach. Drop peaches into boiling water for 1 minute and then plunge into ice water. The skin should peel easily. Once peeled, eat or cook immediately.

Recipes

  • Fresh Peach SalsaVeggie Inspired This easy fruit salsa recipe is perfect for summer. It’s sweet and juicy with a subtle heat. Perfect for snacking with chips or using as a topping for burgers and tacos. Grab some fresh ripe peaches and enjoy!
  • Grilled Peaches Wrapped in ProsciuttoIn the Kitch Sweet, char-grilled peach wedges wrapped in savory, salty cured meat and drizzled with a simple but delicious balsamic vinaigrette.
  • Strawberry Peach SmoothieFrom Michigan to the Table I make this strawberry peach smoothie several times a week. It is a quick healthy grab and go morning breakfast. My daughter and I get requests to make this healthy strawberry peach smoothie recipe all the time and we gladly say “yes”!
Strawberries

Strawberries

Strawberries are one of the most popular fruits in the world. Strawberries are frequently eaten fresh, as part of a mixed fruit salad, topping a dessert like a fruit tart or cake, or in a savory salad. They can also be cooked into jams and compotes or baked into cakes and breads.

Buying

Look for brightly colored plump strawberries with fresh green caps. Avoid strawberries that are wilted, moldy, bruised, or have white or green parts.

Storing

Strawberries can be refrigerated for 3 to 5 days. Take them out of the refrigerator 30 minutes before consuming. They taste sweeter when at room temperature.

Preparing

Just before eating or cooking strawberries, swish in a bowl of cold water to clean. Do not soak the strawberries. Hull (remove the leaves and green caps) and slice strawberries as desired.

Recipes

Swiss Chard

Swiss Chard

Swiss chard is less bitter when it is raw rather than when it is cooked. Swiss chard is a great source of vitamin A, vitamin K, and vitamin C.

Buying

Swiss Chard should have dark green leaves and brightly colored stems, Avoid swiss chard that is dried out and brown.

Storing

Swiss chard can be kept in the refrigerato9r for up to five days.

Preparing

Swiss chard can be eaten raw or cooked. Before using chard, cut the leaves away from the stems and wash leaves in cold water. Rinse stems and trim off any blemishes. Swiss chard stems are tougher than the leaves and require a longer cooking time of an additional five minutes.

Recipes

  • Sauteed Greens and OnionsEating Richly Like a healthy version of soul food, torn chard leaves are sauteed with intensely flavorful onions, garlic, and bacon. It’s fast, simple, and immensely satisfying.
  • Swiss Chard FrittataSidewalk Shoes  Frittata Recipes are perfect for meatless main dishes. This Swiss Chard Frittata can be on the table in under an hour making it a great weeknight dinner!
  • Swiss Chard and PotatoesAll That’s Jas Ready for another super easy side dish that your whole family will love? This beautiful Swiss chard (blitva) and potatoes dish is found on almost every menu along the Croatian coastline and islands of the Adriatic Sea.
sliced watermelon

Watermelon

Watermelon has sweet, juicy flesh and is usually deep red to pink in color, with numerous black seeds, although seedless varieties do exist. The fruit is often eaten raw while the rind is usually pickled. The seeds have a nutty flavor and can be dried and roasted, or ground into flour. Watermelon is 91% water.

Buying

Look for watermelons that are symmetrical in shape, heavy for their size, and dull not shiny. Watermelons should have dried stems and yellowish undersides. Watermelons develop a large, creamy yellow spot (or field spot) on the rind during the growing process. That yellow spot means the watermelon had time to ripen in the sun and is ready to eat.

Avoid watermelons that have bruises, cuts, dents, and are light for their size.

Storing

Store whole watermelons at room temperature. Refrigerate cut watermelon in an airtight container and use within 4 days.

Preparing

Wash, rinse, and dry a watermelon before cutting it.

Recipes

Zucchini

Zucchini

Zucchini is considered a summer squash. Meaning its prime season is May to August. Summer squash has a thin, soft skin and soft edible seeds, whereas winter squash has hard skin and seeds. Zucchini can grow really big! The biggest one ever recorded was 7 feet 10 inches. Most zucchinis would grow to be as big as a baseball bat but they are usually picked when they are much smaller because as they grow they become tough and fibrous.

Buying

Look for zucchini that are no longer than six inches and one to two inches in diameter. Zucchini should have firm, shiny, and slightly prickly skin, be free of cuts and blemishes, and have at least one inch of stem attached. Avoid longer and bigger zucchini they tend to be tough and fibrous. Also, avoid zucchini that are soft or have cuts and blemishes.

Storing

Store zucchini, unwashed, in a perforated plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator for up to 5 days. If  zucchini starts to wilt, use immediately. Cooked zucchini should be covered, refrigerated and used within two days. To freeze zucchini, slice into rounds, blanch for two minutes, plunge into cold water, drain, and seal in airtight containers or baggies. Frozen zucchini may be kept up to one year.

Preparing

Wash zucchini just before preparation. Peeling is not necessary.

Recipes

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This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Christina Conte

    What a great help in knowing what’s in season and how to use them. Lovely recipes too, thank you!

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