March Seasonal Produce Guide

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March Seasonal Produce Guide

Welcome to my March Seasonal Produce Guide. Seasonal produce is cheaper, fresher, more nutritional, and eco-friendly because it doesn’t have to travel as far.

Spring is on its way! Which means there are new items in season this month. What is in season in March? Produce peaks at different times throughout the US so there will be some variances. But here is a general guide.

Every month I will be sharing a produce guide with seasonal recipe suggestions. Check out my March Seasonal Produce Guide below for more information on how to choose, store and prepare each ingredient

March Seasonal Produce Guide

Artichokes

Artichokes

A cooked, unseasoned artichoke has a light delicate flavor. The leaves are often removed one at a time, and the fleshy base is eaten. The fibrous upper part of each leaf is usually discarded. The heart is eaten when the inedible choke has been peeled away from the base and discarded. The thin leaves covering the choke are also edible.

Buying

Choose artichokes that feel heavy for their size and have firm, tightly packed leaves that are green. Avoid artichokes that feel soft or have dry, split or brown leaves.

Storing

Do not rinse or cut the artichoke prior to storing. Sprinkle the artichokes with a little water, and place them in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Fresh artichokes will keep for 3-5 days.

Preparing

Rinse the artichoke in cold water, using a soft brush or cloth to remove any film from the exterior. Trim one inch from the top (pointed end) of the artichoke. Cut a quarter-inch off the stem. Use your fingers to slightly separate the petals, opening the artichoke so that seasonings can be better distributed. Cook as desired.

To prepare the heart, trim the leaves and cut off the top so the fuzzy purple choke is exposed. Use a spoon or melon baller to remove all of the choke, which is not edible. Use a paring knife to remove the outer leaves and base of the stem, leaving only the tender inner stem, or the heart.

Once cut artichokes can begin to turn brown. Placing them in water slightly acidified with vinegar or lemon juice can prevent the discoloration.

Recipes

Anchovy Parsley Pesto Stuffed ArtichokeTasting Page
Slow Cooker Garlic Artichokes RecipeChristina’s Cucina

Broccoli
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Broccoli

Broccoli is part of the cabbage family and is a good source of vitamin C and vitamin K.

Buying

Choose broccoli that has closed florets and deep green color. Avoid broccoli with yellowing or that is soft.

Storing

Refrigerated broccoli will keep for up to five days.

Preparing

Wash and then cut into appropriately sized pieces. All but the very end of the stock can be used.

Recipes

Baked Broccoli and Cauliflower Balls with CheeseWhere is my Spoon
Garlic Parmesan Roasted BroccoliTo Simply Inspire

Brussels Sprouts
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Brussel Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are delicious and can be boiled, steamed, sauteed, grilled, roasted, and even fried. They are even great when served raw and shredded into a slaw. They are part of the cabbage family and are most commonly green but there are a few varieties that are purple in color. They are high in vitamin C and vitamin K.

Buying

If possible choose brussels sprouts that are still on the stalk. Look for brussels sprouts with bright, firm, and compact heads.

Storing

Brussels sprouts can be refrigerated in a plastic bag for up to a week.

Preparing

Remove brussels sprouts from the stalk and cut off the stem. You can also remove any of the loose outer leaves.

Recipes

Brussel Sprout SaladFresh Coast Eats
Roasted Brussels Sprout Soup with BaconLow Carb Yum

Cauliflower
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Cauliflower

Cauliflower is super popular right now. Masquerading as a pizza crust, mashed potatoes, and rice. Cauliflower comes in several varieties including white, orange, green, and purple. Cauliflower can be roasted, grilled, boiled, fried, steamed, pickled, or eaten raw. It is high in vitamin C and vitamin K.

Buying

Look for cauliflower that is compact with firmly attached bright green leaves. Avoid cauliflower with brown spots or spread out sections.

Storing

Cauliflower can be refrigerated for up to five days.

Preparing

Wash cauliflower just before use. Remove the outer leaves, stem, and core. Then break or cut it into smaller pieces. Reusable Block

Recipes

Tropical Cauliflower SmoothieThe Recipe Well
Roasted Cauliflower SteaksEveryday Delicious

Leeks on wooden cutting board
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Leeks

Leeks have a mild onion-like flavor. Leeks are a good source of fiber, vitamin B6, iron and magnesium. They are also a very good source of folate as well as vitamins A, C, and K.

Buying

Look for leeks that are firm and have as much white and light green parts as possible.

Storing

Leeks can be refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Preparing

The dark green leaves are usually tough. Most dishes use just the white and light green portions. Leeks grow in sandy soil and need to be washed thoroughly. Cut off the root and then slice the leek in half vertically. Chop and place in a bowl of cold water. Agitate the leeks well, then drain and use.

Recipes

Leek and Potato Soup Raspberries and Kohlrabi
Smoked Salmon Quiche with LeeksA Baking Journey

Lettuce
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Lettuce

Lettuce is most often used raw in salads and sandwiches but it can also be grilled. Lettuce is an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A, folate, and iron.

Buying

Look for fresh crisp leaves that are tightly bunched. Avoid lettuce with wilted or brown leaves.

Storing

Lettuce should be loosely covered and can be refrigerated for up to one week.

Preparing

Rinse lettuce under cold water. Use a salad spinner or pat the leaves dry to remove excess moisture. Slice, chop or tear as needed.

Recipes

Healthy Greek Mason Jar SaladEasy Budget Recipes
Grilled Romaine Hearts with Pancetta, Pecorino and Pine NutsPina Bresciani

Mushrooms
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Mushrooms

Mushrooms are an excellent source of B vitamins, selenium, and copper.

Buying

Mushrooms should look fresh and smell good. Avoid mushrooms that smell of mildew or mold. Also avoid mushrooms that look shriveled, desiccated, darkened, wet, or moldy.

Storing

Mushrooms should be stored in a paper bag in the refrigerator or wrapped in paper towels and then loosely wrapped with plastic. Enclosing mushrooms in a plastic bag will cause them to sweat and spoil more quickly. Wild mushrooms will last for a few days stored this way; cultivated mushrooms will last up to a week or two.

Preparing

Mushrooms are like sponges and will soak up any liquid they get near. Relatively clean mushrooms can be brushed clean with a pastry brush or dry paper towel. For more cleaning power, use a damp paper towel. Reusable Block

Recipes

Easy Pierogi Stuffed MushroomsFood Meanderings
Delicious Savoury Vegan Mushroom and Leek Pie RecipeAttachment Mummy

Parsnips
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Parsnips

Parsnips are a root vegetable closely related to the carrot. Parsnips are high in potassium and fiber.

Buying

Choose parsnips that are firm and smooth. Smaller parsnips may be more flavorful and tender.

Storing

Parsnips can be refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Preparing

Wash parsnips in cold water and cut off both ends. Trim any major rootlets or knobs before cooking. Parsnips can be cooked into savory stews, boiled, mashed, or roasted.

Recipes

Artichoke Spinach Chicken Burgers & Fennel Beet Parsnip PureeStrength & Sunshine
Parsnip Soup with Celery RootPickled Plum

Pineapple

Pineapples

Pineapples grow as a small shrub. Pineapple is rich in manganese and vitamin C and is very sweet but low in calories.

Buying

Look for pineapples with dark green compact leaves that are heavy for their size. Pineapples are ripe once a majority of the base has turned yellow with very little green left. Avoid pineapples with soft or dark spots and dry yellow leaves.

Storing

Store pineapples at room temperature for up to 2 days or refrigerate for up to 5 days. Refrigerate cut pineapple in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

Preparing

Use a sharp knife to remove rind and leaves, then cut as desired, removing the core as needed.

Recipes

Brown Sugar Pineapple Pork ChopsKitchen Gone Rogue
One-Pot Vegan Pineapple Fried RiceRhian’s Recipes

Red Radishes

Radishes

Radishes are a root vegetable and are often eaten raw on salads. Radishes have a sharp spicy flavor.

Buying

Look for radishes that are smooth and brightly colored. The leaves should be green and fresh looking. Avoid radishes that are soft or dull looking.

Storing

Remove the radish greens, which are edible, before storing in a plastic bag. Refrigerate for up to one week.

Preparing

Slice off the roots and leaves, wash and pat dry. Radishes can be served whole, sliced, diced, minced, and/or grated, depending on the recipe. Cook radishes to temper their bitter flavor.

Recipes

Daikon Salad with Green Apple and PepitasFearless Dining
Salpicón de Res: Beef and Mint SaladA Taste for Travel

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

The rutabaga is a root vegetable that is a cross between the cabbage and the turnip. It has a slightly spicier flavor than the turnip. Rutabagas can reach three to five pounds in weight. Rutabagas contain a small amount of vitamins A and C.

Buying

Rutabagas should be smooth, firm, without blemishes, and heavy for their size. Avoid large roots, they tend to be more fibrous. If you smell a rutabaga, the more pronounced the odor, the more pungent the flavor.

Storing

Rutabagas can be stored unwashed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. The leaves should be removed to prevent the root from drying out.

Preparing

Scrub rutabagas under cold running water before using. Cut into pieces and remove the core if it is brownish. Rutabagas can be boiled, steamed, mashed, roasted, baked, and fried. 

Recipes

Brown Sugar Roasted RutabagaSpend with Pennies
Instant Pot Rutabaga MashRecipes from a Pantry

Turnips
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Turnips

Both the turnip root and turnip greens are edible.

Buying

Look for turnips that are heavy for their size and still have their leaves attached. Small to medium-sized turnips tend to be sweeter.

Storing

The longer a turnip is stored the more bitter it becomes. Turnips can be refrigerated for up to three days.

Preparing

Before cooking turnips, wash and peel the skin with a vegetable peeler. Next, trim off the roots and greens.

Recipes

Spring Turnips with Herbed ChickenTwists & Zests
Turnip Fries & Peanut Dipping Sauce RecipePowered by Mom

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