November Seasonal Produce Guide

November Produce Guide

Seasonal produce is cheaper, fresher, more nutritional, and eco-friendly because it doesn’t have to travel as far. Fall is here and national stuff your face day is on its way. What is in season in November? Produce peaks at different times throughout the US so there will be some variances. But here is a general guide.

Every month I will be sharing a seasonal produce guide. Check out our November seasonal produce guide below for more information including shopping tips and recipes.

November Seasonal Produce Guide

Beets
Photo by FOODISM360 on Unsplash

Beets

Beets are a root vegetable with a deep earthy flavor and are an excellent source of fiber, folate, manganese, potassium, iron, and vitamin C. They can be eaten raw, cooked or pickled. Roasting beets brings out their natural sweetness. Their leaves, known as beet greens, can also be eaten. Beets can be yellow, white, pink, or dark purple.

Buying

Beets should be heavy for their size. Smaller beets are sweeter and more tender.

Storing

Beets can be refrigerated for up to a week.

Preparing

Scrub beets with a brush and remove the roots and the tops, then cut as desired.

Recipes

Pearl Couscous Salad with Feta and BeetAmanda’s Cookin’
Sweet & Spicy Quinoa Beet Burgers with Mango & SproutsAmbitious Kitchen

Broccoli
Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Broccoli

Broccoli is part of the cabbage family and is a good source of vitamin C and vitamin K.

Buying

Choose broccoli that has closed florets and deep green color. Avoid broccoli with yellowing or that is soft.

Storing

Refrigerated broccoli will keep for up to five days.

Preparing

Wash and then cut into appropriately sized pieces. All but the very end of the stock can be used.

Recipes

Broccoli and Cheese Tater Tot Stuffed Portobello MushroomsClimbing Grier Mountain
Paleo Broccoli QuicheConfessions of an Overworked Mom

Brussel Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are delicious and can be boiled, steamed, sauteed, grilled, roasted, and even fried. They are even great when served raw and shredded into a slaw. They are part of the cabbage family and are most commonly green but there are a few varieties that are purple in color. They are high in vitamin C and vitamin K.

Buying

If possible choose brussels sprouts that are still on the stalk. Look for brussels sprouts with bright, firm, and compact heads.

Storing

Brussels sprouts can be refrigerated in a plastic bag for up to a week.

Preparing

Remove brussels sprouts from the stalk and cut off the stem. You can also remove any of the loose outer leaves.

Recipes

Pear Bacon and Brussels Sprout SaladCooking Classy
Pomegranate Pecan Brussels SproutsDinner at the Zoo

Cabbage
Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

Cabbage

Cabbage can be dark green, purple, white, or light green. Cabbage is a great source of vitamin K, vitamin C, and fiber.

Buying

Look for cabbage that is compact with blemish-free leaves. Avoid cabbages that are light for their size.

Storing

Cabbage can be refrigerated for up to seven days. Once cut cabbage should be stored in an airtight container.

Preparing

Remove the outer leaves and then slice into pieces. Wash under running water and remove the core.

Recipes

Crock-Pot Cabbage, Kielbasa Sausage and PotatoesCrock-Pot Ladies
Grilled Fish Tacos with a Tomatillo Avocado SlawCherished Bliss

Cauliflower
Photo by Jennifer Schmidt on Unsplash

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is super popular right now. Masquerading as a pizza crust, mashed potatoes, and rice. Cauliflower comes in several varieties including white, orange, green, and purple. Cauliflower can be roasted, grilled, boiled, fried, steamed, pickled, or eaten raw. It is high in vitamin C and vitamin K.

Buying

Look for cauliflower that is compact with firmly attached bright green leaves. Avoid cauliflower with brown spots or spread out sections.

Storing

Cauliflower can be refrigerated for up to five days.

Preparing

Wash cauliflower just before use. Remove the outer leaves, stem, and core. Then break or cut it into smaller pieces. Reusable Block

Recipes

Chicken Fried Riced CauliflowerDomestic Superhero
Mashed CauliflowerEasy Low Carb

Cranberries
Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

Cranberries

Cranberries are hard, sour, and bitter. 95% of cranberries are used to make cranberry juice and sauce. Cranberries are a good source of vitamin C and fiber.

Buying

Look for cranberries that are shiny and plumb. Avoid cranberries that are shriveled or blemished.

Storing

Cranberries can be refrigerated for up to two months. Cranberries can be kept in the freezer for up to a year and used in recipes without thawing.

Preparing

Cranberries are not typically eaten raw and are usually cooked. Wash cranberries under running water before using them.

Recipes

Apple Cranberry Bacon Kale SaladEatwell 101
Easy Cranberry BBQ SauceEazy Peazy Meals

Leeks
Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

Leeks

Leeks have a mild onion-like flavor. Leeks are a good source of fiber, vitamin B6, iron and magnesium. They are also a very good source of folate as well as vitamins A, C, and K.

Buying

Look for leeks that are firm and have as much white and light green parts as possible.

Storing

Leeks can be refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Preparing

The dark green leaves are usually tough. Most dishes use just the white and light green portions. Leeks grow in sandy soil and need to be washed thoroughly. Cut off the root and then slice the leek in half vertically. Chop and place in a bowl of cold water. Agitate the leeks well, then drain and use.

Recipes

Double Layered Mashed Potato CasseroleFoolproof Living
Roasted Leek VichyssoiseFuss Free Flavours

Mushrooms
Photo by Christine Siracusa on Unsplash

Mushrooms

Mushrooms are an excellent source of B vitamins, selenium, and copper.

Buying

Mushrooms should look fresh and smell good. Avoid mushrooms that smell of mildew or mold. Also avoid mushrooms that look shriveled, desiccated, darkened, wet, or moldy.

Storing

Mushrooms should be stored in a paper bag in the refrigerator or wrapped in paper towels and then loosely wrapped with plastic. Enclosing mushrooms in a plastic bag will cause them to sweat and spoil more quickly. Wild mushrooms will last for a few days stored this way; cultivated mushrooms will last up to a week or two.

Preparing

Mushrooms are like sponges and will soak up any liquid they get near. Relatively clean mushrooms can be brushed clean with a pastry brush or dry paper towel. For more cleaning power, use a damp paper towel. Reusable Block

Recipes

Make-Ahead Stuffed MushroomsFood, Folks and Fun
Pecorino Mashed Cauliflower with Sherry-Rosemary MushroomsFoodie and the Fix

Sliced Oranges
Photo by Suzy Hazelwood from Pexels

Oranges

Oranges can be eaten fresh or processed for their juice or peel. Oranges are a great source of vitamin C.

Buying

Oranges should be firm and heavy for their size. They should also have smooth bright-colored skin. Avoid oranges with blemished and wrinkled skin.

Storing

Oranges can be stored at room temperature for up to five days or refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Preparing

Oranges can be peeled and sectioned by hand. Using a knife you can also prepare skinless orange segments. With a sharp knife, cut off the top and the bottom of the orange and cut away the remaining peel and white pith. Next, either slice the fruit or cut along either side of each segment to release it. If you need the zest, grate it before peeling the fruit.

Recipes

Avocado Citrus SaladHow Sweet Eats
Oven-Baked Orange CauliflowerI am a Food Blog

Parsnips
Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

Parsnips

Parsnips are a root vegetable closely related to the carrot. Parsnips are high in potassium and fiber.

Buying

Choose parsnips that are firm and smooth. Smaller parsnips may be more flavorful and tender.

Storing

Parsnips can be refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Preparing

Wash parsnips in cold water and cut off both ends. Trim any major rootlets or knobs before cooking. Parsnips can be cooked into savory stews, boiled, mashed, or roasted.

Recipes

Homemade Cranberry Sauce with ParsnipsIt’s a Veg World After All
1-Hour Fall Pot PieMinimalist Baker

Pears
Photo by Marta Dzedyshko from Pexels

Pears

Pears can be divided into two categories: European and Asian. European pears are smooth-skinned and are wider at the bottom than the top. Asian pears are uniform in color (yellowish-tan) and shaped more like apples. Asian pears do not change color after being harvested, while some European ones do.

Buying

Look for pears that are firm and without bruises. Pears are ripe when the skin near the stem yields to gentle pressure.

Storing

Pears can be stored at room temperature until they are ripe. Once ripened they will keep in the refrigerator for up to three days.

Preparing

Wash pears just before eating or using for cooking.

Recipes

Browned Butter Pear CrispLife Made Simple
Roasted Pear Salad with Lemon VinaigretteLittle Broken

Persimmons
Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Persimmons

Persimmon is a berry that comes from fruit trees in the genus, Diospyros. Persimmons are great for making jams, pies, steamed puddings, bread and muffins, stuffing, curry, and cookies. They are also delicious when sliced and served fresh in salads. Persimmons have a flavor similar to apricots and are a great source of fiber, manganese, and vitamin C.

Buying

Persimmons should be smooth, brightly colored, plump, well-rounded, and still, have a leaf attached. Avoid persimmons with bruises or yellow patches.

Storing

Store persimmons at room temperature until soft and ripe. Refrigerate ripe persimmons for up to three days.

Preparing

Persimmons can be eaten fresh, dried or cooked. To eat fresh persimmons, cut or peel the skin and cut into quarters or eat whole like an apple. Consume overly ripe persimmons by removing the top leaf with a paring knife and scooping out the flesh with a spoon.

Recipes

Persimmon Bread RecipeNatasha’s Kitchen
Shredded Brussels Sprout Persimmon Salad  – The Forked Spoon

Pomegranate
Photo by Laura on Unsplash

Pomegranates

The number of arils (seeds) in a pomegranate can vary from 200 to 1,400. Pomegranates are a good source of fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K, and folate.

Buying

Pomegranates should be round, plump, and heavy for their size. Avoid pomegranates with cuts or bruises.

Storing

Store pomegranates for up to a month in a cool, dry place or refrigerate them for up to two months. Refrigerate seeds in an airtight container up to 5 days.

Preparing

Fair warning, pomegranates can be messy. The bright red juice can stain fingers, clothes, counters, and cutting boards. First, fill a large bowl with water. Slice off the top, then cut a slit through the skin of the pomegranate. Tear the fruit open with the slit facing away from you. Rip the fruit into chunks under water and remove the arils (seeds). The seeds will sink, and the white will membrane float.

Recipes

Sticky Pomegranate Ginger Chicken and Broccoli with Coconut Brown RiceLively Table
Citrus and Pomegranate Fruit SaladOnce Upon a Chef

Pumpkins
Photo by Kerstin Wrba on Unsplash

Pumpkins

Sugar pumpkins or pie pumpkins are smaller and sweeter. Most parts of the pumpkin are edible, including the shell, seeds, leaves, and flowers. Pumpkin is a great source of vitamin A and vitamin C.

Buying

Look for pumpkins that are small but heavy for their size and have their stems intact. Avoid pumpkins with soft spots.

Storing

Store pumpkins at room temperature for up to a month or refrigerate for up to three months. Wrap cut pumpkins in plastic and refrigerate for up to five days.

Preparing

Wash pumpkins, and then cut them lengthwise. Remove the seeds and excess fiber. Trim skin with a paring knife or peeler if desired. Cook as desired. Reusable Block

Recipes

Caribbean Chicken Pumpkin SoupMy Recipe Confessions
Mini Pumpkin Pecan Pie BitesNellie Bellie

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

The rutabaga is a root vegetable that is a cross between the cabbage and the turnip. It has a slightly spicier flavor than the turnip. Rutabagas can reach three to five pounds in weight. Rutabagas contain a small amount of vitamins A and C.

Buying

Rutabagas should be smooth, firm, without blemishes, and heavy for their size. Avoid large roots, they tend to be more fibrous. If you smell a rutabaga, the more pronounced the odor, the more pungent the flavor.

Storing

Rutabagas can be stored unwashed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. The leaves should be removed to prevent the root from drying out.

Preparing

Scrub rutabagas under cold running water before using. Cut into pieces and remove the core if it is brownish. Rutabagas can be boiled, steamed, mashed, roasted, baked, and fried. 

Recipes

Roasted Chicken with Root VegetablesStriped Spatula
Roasted Root Vegetable Buddha BowlsShe Likes Food

Spinach
Photo by jacqueline howell from Pexels

Spinach

Spinach is a great source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, folic acid, iron, and calcium. Popeye was credited with increasing consumption of spinach in the 1930s by 33 percent.

Buying

Spinach should be crisp and green, Avoid spinach that looks wilted or slimy.

Storing

Loosely wrap spinach in a damp paper towel and refrigerate in a plastic bag for up to five days.

Preparing

Rinse spinach under cold water in a colander. Use a salad spinner or pat the leaves dry to remove excess moisture. Spinach can be eaten raw or cooked.

Recipes

Chicken with White Beans and Wilted SpinachPlace of My Taste
Roast Pumpkin, Spinach and Feta Salad with Honey Balsamic DressingRecipeTin Eats

Sweet Potato
Photo by Ela Haney from Pexels

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are high in vitamin C and fiber.

Buying

Sweet potatoes should have smooth skin. Avoid sweet potatoes with soft spots, cuts, or blemishes.

Storing

Sweet potatoes should be stored in a cool, dark, and well-ventilated place. They will keep for up to one month.

Preparing

Scrub sweet potatoes and peel if desired. Sweet potato skin is edible.

Recipes

Turkey Sweet Potato ChiliSalt & Lavender
Sweet Potato CobblerSouthern Bite

Tangerines
Photo by julie aagaard from Pexels

Tangerines

Tangerines are smaller and less rounded than oranges. They are also typically sweeter than an orange. The peel can be used fresh or dried as a spice or zest for baking or a garnish for drinks.

Buying

Tangerines should be a deep orange color, firm, and heavy for their size.

Storing

Tangerines can be stored at room temperature for up to five days or refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Preparing

Tangerines can be peeled and sectioned by hand. Using a knife you can also prepare skinless tangerine segments. With a sharp knife, cut off the top and the bottom of the orange and cut away the remaining peel and white pith. Next, either slice the fruit or cut along either side of each segment to release it. If you need the zest, grate it before peeling the fruit.

Recipes

Bourbon Infused Cranberry SauceSassy Kitchen
Grilled Orange ChickenTastes of Lizzy T

Turnips
Photo by Vanessa Bucceri on Unsplash

Turnips

Both the turnip root and turnip greens are edible.

Buying

Look for turnips that are heavy for their size and still have their leaves attached. Small to medium-sized turnips tend to be sweeter.

Storing

The longer a turnip is stored the more bitter it becomes. Turnips can be refrigerated for up to three days.

Preparing

Before cooking turnips, wash and peel the skin with a vegetable peeler. Next, trim off the roots and greens.

Recipes

Roasted Root VegetablesSpend with Pennies
Ginger Miso SoupLove and Lemons

Winter Squash
Photo by Ryan Jacobs on Unsplash

Winter Squash

Winter squash refers to several squash species. They differ from summer squash in that they are harvested and eaten in the mature fruit stage when the seeds within have matured fully and the skin has hardened into a tough rind. At this stage, most varieties of this fruit can be stored for use during the winter. Winter squash is generally cooked before being eaten, and the skin or rind is not usually eaten as it is with summer squash.

Buying

Winter squashes should be heavy for their size, with smooth dull skin and no soft spots.

Storing

Winter squashes can be refrigerated for up to two weeks. Once they have been cut they should be refrigerated and used within four days.

Preparing

To make cutting winter squashes easier, pierce the skin in a few spots and microwave on high for 2 minutes. Cut the squash in half and remove the fibers and seeds.

Recipes

One-Pot Shrimp and Squash OrzoSweet Peas and Saffron
Gochujang Winter Squash SlidersVegan Richa

Check out what’s in season in October.

I am linking this post up to some amazing blog parties. Here is a complete list of places I party.

November Produce Guide

Leave a Reply

Facebook
Pinterest